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Seasonal Eating

Information on storing and managing foods during the pandemic.​

What’s in Season for Winter?

Mushrooms, Citrus Fruits, Winter Squash, Potatoes, Herbs, Turnips, Hearty Greens (Kale and Collards), Dried Fruits, Canned and Frozen Harvest,

What’s Cooking Now?   

Comfort Foods!

Braised Chicken Thighs with Collards​
Braised Chicken Thighs with Collard Greens

January is cold and blustery. The perfect time for warm, hearty comfort foods to bring the family around the table. For many, comfort foods are family favorites from the recipe vault—things that your parents or grandparents made or that you ate as a child. Often times comfort foods refer to foods that warm you up, fill you up and stick-to-your-ribs. Casseroles, soups, stews, slow cooker dishes and roasted  or baked meals all fall into this category. Many comfort foods require a little putting together, but then cook on their own for several hours.  So keep warm and fill your family up on hearty comfort foods this winter.

Welsh Rarebit Chicken and Broccoli Casserole
Welsh Rarebit Chicken and Broccoli Casserole
Extension Explores Food Preservation Ad
Extension Explores is a monthly program combining internet-based learning using the zoom platform, how to videos, quick tips and recipes using preserved food. Recordings from the live sessions as well as many resources can be found at https://bedford.tennessee.edu/extension-explores-food-preservation/.

Check out the Produce Information Pages Below:

Eat Seasonally!

Seasonal Eating is all about eating what is growing here and now.  A tomato doesn’t taste nearly as good in January when it is out-of-season as it does in July when it comes directly from the grower to you or to the grocery store.  Produce eaten when it is in-season tastes better and maintains more of its nutrients.  Eating with the seasons also helps reduce transportation, saving gas and emissions, as well as helps to support our local growers and local economy.  

To eat seasonally, try growing your own produce this Spring and Summer to use throughout the growing season and preserve what you can’t use through freezing or canning. Another option is to frequent the local farmer’s markets.  Even when shopping at the grocery stores, focus on what is seasonal for that month.

To see what is growing in Tennessee each month take a look at the Seasonal Eating Chart for Tennessee​.

Collard Greens
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Sweet Peppers
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Summer Squash
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Strawberries
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Spinach
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Potatoes
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Sweet Potatoes
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Carrots
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Snap Beans
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Cabbage
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Chard
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The Seasonal Kitchen Videos:

Know Your Carrots
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Know Your Sweet Peppers
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Know Your Collards
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Know Your Sweet Potatoes
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Know Your Snap Beans
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Know Your Summer Squash
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Pasta Stuffed Peppers
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Roasted Pork Tenderloin & Sweet Carrot Chutney
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Braised Chicken Thighs with Collards​
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Cranberry Orange Sweet Potatoes
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Green Beans with Tangy Vinaigrette
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Chicken Sausage and Summer Vegetable Sauté​
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